The Arousal of Nature

Feb 5, 2005 - Mar 2, 2005

Walter Wickiser Gallery

568 Broadway
Suite 104B
New York, NY 10012

Phone Number: 347-782-1653
Contact: Joseph R. Flicek
Description:

Melinda Camber Porter Exhibition, The Arousal of Nature, February 5, 2005 to March 2, 2005 at the Walter Wickiser Gallery 568 Broadway, Suite 104B, New York, NY 10012

Exhibition Descriptions by Walter Wickiser: I first became aware of Melinda’s work in 2003 when I saw her beautiful, vibrant large oils from The Triptych Series at the Asia Society and Museum. I was amazed by her imagery and her skill as a painter. I had never seen anything like her work in all my years as an art dealer. Her use of line and form is completely original, and although her work is figurative, it is also groundbreaking in its exploration of abstraction. Her work could be defined as “figurative abstraction,” because she pioneers new territory in both the abstract and figurative domains.


When I first saw her imagery at the Asia Society and Museum, I began to appreciate how organically she connects her paintings to music and theatre. I was astounded by the way her Triptych paintings inspired the creation of her libretto for the rock opera Journey to Benares. I was impressed with the way the paintings also became the concept for the set design. Melinda has a history of working in a completely innovative way with composers. As a rock musician myself, I could see the way her paintings have a musical affinity and how her extraordinary use of color would inspire a composer.

But I also learned at the Asia Society how open Melinda is to the beauty of other cultures. Her work in Journey to Benares mingled Asian and Western traditions in an original and imaginative way. This experience of seeing Melinda’s work at the Asia Society was a formative, powerful moment in my art education. The paintings I saw there stayed within me and seemed to find a permanent home in my memory. I realized that I couldn’t forget her paintings and I couldn’t define them. But I did realize these were completely new images representing a new dimension in painting. After a few months of living with Melinda’s paintings in my mind’s eye, I sent my curator, Masumi Doeda, to visit Melinda’s painting studio and see her work.

And then I made my first visit to her studio and was overwhelmed by what I saw. As I entered this world of her paintings, I was transported into a new era, and I had the sensation of being catapulted into a fresh perception of space and time. Melinda’s imagery in its beauty and originality was awe-inspiring. Then Melinda suddenly said, “Why don’t you come into my xii | Foreword apartment next door and see some of my earlier work?” So I followed her there, and when I saw her work from ten years earlier, such as the large oil on canvas Fertility, a backdrop to another musical, Night Angel. There were oils from the Art of Love traveling exhibition and Barcelona Point, and I was suddenly confronted with the source of her innovative pioneering. I could see I was in the presence of an artist who is faithfully pursuing her own cosmology and is constantly evolving, evolving, evolving. It took me over eighteen months to even begin to understand the full complexity and genius that underlies the creation of these very beautiful paintings. It has always taken people time to appreciate the innovative imagery of great artists such as Monet and Gauguin. Real originality always takes time to appreciate because one has never seen the image before. And how can you absorb something so new immediately? But great art gives back. For me, spending time with Melinda’s paintings has really taught me a new way to see.  - Walter Wickiser New York

Event Type: Exhibition